News

From the Praetor's Office- Reaction Housing for Disaster Victims November 11 2015, 0 Comments

How Hurricane Katrina Inspired A Revolutionary New Disaster Shelter

Praetorian prides itself on recognizing revolutionary and innovative new technology in the field of disaster response, and so it is the case with the "Exo Shelter" Kudos to the designer Michael McDaniel for his perseverance in designing a quick deployment shelter.

The crisis that followed Hurricane Katrina eight years ago inspired Michael McDaniel to create EXO. The innovative emergency housing system offers a surprisingly simple alternative to house the over 32 million people who are displaced from natural disasters every year.


Praetorian "Instant-Plumber" Leak and Drip Sacks (AB-300) August 30 2015, 0 Comments

Praetorian Leak and Drip Sacks,

Praetorian AB-300 Domestic leak and drip sacks are an essential part of any Home, Business, Hotel/ Motel, or Multi-Family developments, plumbing defense. They are designed to absorb and contain domestic plumbing mishaps that can cost thousands if left unattended. The AB-300 absorbs 20 Lbs. of contaminated liquids from toilets, sinks, faucets, dishwashers, washing machines, hot water heaters, leaky roofs or, ice damming.

  • Each sack contains a super absorbent polymer that swells on contact with sewage water
  • The sacks are light weight and easy to stow
  • They are easily deployable, just drop in overflowing toilet or around leak and they activate
  • Absorbs approximately 30 lbs. of contaminated water
  • Long Shelf life

If you manage a Hotel, Motel, or Apartment Complex the AB-300 is a must have! 

If you have ever had to clean up after Grandpa's business that overflowed to the downstairs kitchen, then this product is for you.

If you have ever had a third story tenant's kid overflow the tub, and cause flooding on the second, and first floors, the AB300 should be in your arsenal of flood and leak defense.   


Sub-Tropical Storm Ana - First named storm of the season May 08 2015, 0 Comments

From the Praetor's Office

Subtropical Storm Ana has formed off the southern Atlantic coast of the United States, making it the first named tropical system of the 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said Friday night that Ana had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph (95 kph) and was centered about 140 miles (225 kilometers) southeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

The storm, which had been stationary over the past few hours was moving north at 2 mph (4 kph). Tropical storm watches and warnings have been issued for parts of both Carolinas, and the Hurricane Center also warns of rough surf and rip currents.

Ana is expected to deliver 2 to 4 inches of rain over the weekend, with some areas getting up to 6 inches.


From the Praetor's Office-Preventing Workplace Accidents January 26 2015, 0 Comments

According to OSHA, slip, trip and fall injuries account for the highest rate of injuries in the work place. They are also the second leading cause of work-related accidental deaths behind auto accidents, with figures reaching 15%. Common injuries due to slip, trip and falls may include: sprains, broken bones, head and back injuries, as well as lacerations.

Company Losses Related to Slips, Trips and Falls:


The costs related to slip and fall accidents can add up quickly and drastically cut into your company’s bottom line. In 2006, the Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index reported the average cost of a slip and fall to be $22,800 per incident, with workers comp claims averaging $19,000.

The out-of-pocket expenditures effect multiple areas of the company. Some of the most common outlays your company may be responsible for:

• Court costs
• Compensation for punitive damages
• Possible repair costs to equipment damaged during injury
• Loss of work and downtime on behalf of injured employee
• Higher insurance premiums
• Worker’s comp claims
• Loss of life

Slip, Trip and Fall Prevention:

Keeping your employees safe is crucial to your company’s success and growth. With better response you will see your employees are able to avoid more slip, trip and fall injuries.

Two responses that can greatly mitigate the possibility of slip, trip, and falls are: (1) A1 PowerSorb, which is an excellent multi-purpose sorbent powder that absorbs a myriad of hazardous compounds; its greatest benefit is that it’s a universal sorbent, able to absorb many different compounds; also (2) Super Absorbent Flood Barriers, pillows filled with a super-absorbent polymer that can absorb 500 x’s their weight in liquid. These two solutions combined can greatly mitigate the potentiality of slip, trip and fall accidents.

For more information contact PraetorianDisasterSupply.com or (281) 507-4639.


From the Praetor's Office - Knowing your Level of Risk May 30 2014, 0 Comments

Know Your Risk

Knowing your level of risk ahead of time will help you make better choices when a storm comes. Visit the Houston Storm Risk Calculator at houstonstormrisk.org to find out what your level of risk is for flooding, storm surge, wind damage and power outages. 

If you live in a hurricane evacuation area, know your zone, and be prepared to evacuate when the order is given.

If you don't live in an evacuation area, you most likely would not have to evacuate for a storm, so make preparations early to ride out a storm in your home.

Get Prepared

You should be prepared to evacuate or to “shelter in place” for a hurricane. Take a moment to review your emergency plan with your family, as well as make sure you have all the necessary supplies to be able to sustain yourself without electricity and running water for 5-7 days. Download a copy of the City of Houston Disaster Preparedness Guide for information on what should be in your plan and your kit. 

Part of preparing is making sure that your insurance adequately covers your property.  Homeowners and renters insurance doesn't normally cover damage from flooding, so make sure you have a flood insurance policy. Visit FloodSmart.gov for information on how to find the right policy for you.

Be Informed

During hurricane season, it's always a good idea to pay attention to developing storms.  Pay attention to local television and radio weather broadcasts, as well as the National Hurricane Center website (hurricanes.gov) for up-to-date information on storms forming in the Atlantic and Gulf.

Sign up for Alert Houston emergency notifications from the City of Houston by visiting alerts.houstonoem.org.  When storms threaten Houston, the City will use this system to tell you about steps you can take to prepare, and provide up-to-date information on conditions and evacuations. Emergency information is always available online at houstontx.gov/emergency.

 

 


From The Praetors Office - Staying in Contact, a matter of Survival September 09 2013, 0 Comments

                                                         Staying in Contact, a matter of survival

 

The Mission of Praetorian is to arm its clients with lessons learned, best practices, and equipment that will mitigate the loss of life or property when catastrophic events occur. 

Imagine this, A massive storm has just devastated your city, power is out with no signs of being restored, cell phones and towers are out, flashflood waters are quickly rising around your home and your family is completely cut off from any possible rescue or human contact.  How will you know if there is an order to evacuate? How will you know which shelters are open? Calling 911 may not be an option. 

 

Are you prepared? 


Most Americans are not, because emergency preparedness is not what we like to think of.   Staying informed could be a matter of life and death, that’s why, the US Department of Homeland Security mandates that every American home should have an emergency radio.

Something as simple as an inexpensive Dynamic/Turbine Crank Emergency Band NOAA Weather Radio, can keep you informed and updated when all else fails; The average cost of a good Emergency Band radio is roughly $50.00. Remember when a catastrophic event occurs, i.e., Hurricanes, Tornados, Chemical Spills, Riots, etc.  Your local Office of Emergency Management continually broadcast over emergency channels providing lifesaving information and instructions to the public, if you are not connected you may be in danger and not know it.

Features of a good Dynamic Crank/Turbine Emergency Band NOAA Weather Radio are: (1) Redundant power sources, Power Crank, Solar Charger, AC adaptor, Internal Rechargeable Batteries, Regular Batteries, (2) Weather Alert, (3) FM and AM channels, (4) Weather Channels, (5) LED light, (6) LED Lamp, and (7) Ports for recharging Cell Phones. 

The most innovative feature is that these radios do not keep you tied to a power outlet, they have redundant power sources.  Emergency radios ensure that you will never be left in the dark, literally and figuratively.


From my own personal experience during Hurricane Ike, for three weeks after the storm we were without power, my Eton dynamo/crank radio needed no batteries, the only information we received was from that small $50.00 radio that keep us informed, without it we would have been in the dark, literally.